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Second Opinion

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Radiculopathy/Sciatica

Radiculopathy/Sciatica

Your spine is made of many bones called vertebrae, and your spinal cord runs through a canal in the center of these bones. Nerve roots split from the cord and travel between the vertebrae into various areas of your body. When these nerve roots become pinched or damaged, the resulting symptoms are called radiculopathy.

Herniated Discs/ Disc Herniation

Herniated Discs/ Disc Herniation

A herniated disc is a relatively common condition that can occur anywhere along the spine, but most often affects the lower back or neck region. Also known as a slipped disc or ruptured disc, a herniated disc develops when one of the cushion-like pads between the vertebrae moves out of position and presses on adjacent nerves.

Degenerative Disc Disease

Degenerative Disc Disease

The intervertebral disc is composed of a ring called the annulus fibrosis that encloses a gelatinous inner structure called the nucleus pulposus. The discs are kept in position with the help of endplates between two vertebral bodies. The intervertebral discs act as shock absorbers.

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Spinal Stenosis

Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spaces within your spine, which can put pressure on the nerves that travel through the spine. Spinal stenosis occurs most often in the lower back and the neck. Spinal stenosis occurs mostly in people older than 50. Younger people with a spine injury or a narrow spinal canal are also at risk. Spinal stenosis is most commonly caused by wear-and-tear changes in the spine related to osteoarthritis.

Sacroiliitis/Sacroiliac Joint Arthropathy

Sacroiliitis/Sacroiliac Joint Arthropathy

Sacroiliitis is the inflammation of one or both of your sacroiliac joints. These two joints are located where the sacrum (the triangular last section of the spine) meets the ilium (a part of the pelvis). Sacroiliitis is a common source of lower back pain or pain in the buttocks or thighs. It is often difficult to diagnose as many other conditions cause pain in the same locations.

Facet Syndrome (Low Back and/or Neck Pain)

Facet Syndrome (Low Back and/or Neck Pain)

The facet joints are the connections between the bones of the spine. The nerve roots pass through these joints to go from the spinal cord to the arms, legs and other parts of the body.

Coccydynia/Tail Bone Pain

Coccydynia/Tail Bone Pain

Coccydynia is a pain in the region of the coccyx, a triangular bone present at the bottom of the spine. Coccydynia is also known as tailbone pain. The pain is usually caused by some kind of trauma, which also causes inflammation of the surrounding tissue that worsens the pain. The condition can make it difficult to sit down on a chair comfortably.

Cervicogenic Headache

Cervicogenic Headache

Cervicogenic headache is referred pain (pain perceived as occurring in a part of the body other than its true source) perceived in the head from a source in the neck. Cervicogenic headache is a secondary headache, which means that it is caused by another illness or physical issue.

Migraine

Migraine Headache

A migraine is a type of headache characterized by severe throbbing pain on one side of the head accompanied by secondary symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light, sound or smell. Other symptoms may include lightheadedness and blurry vision. A migraine may be preceded by an aura, a neurological warning sign, which may occur 10 to 15 minutes before an attack. These include flashes of light, tingling sensations, or speech problems. Sometimes, you may have migraines without an aura. A migraine may last from a few hours to 3 days.

Joint Osteoarthritis

Joint Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears down over time.

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

The peripheral nervous system transmits signals from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. Any disruption in the normal functioning of the peripheral nervous system can result in numbness, pain, and weakness in your hands and feet as well as other parts of your body. Peripheral nerves are fragile and easily damaged. A nerve injury can affect your brain's ability to communicate with your muscles and organs. Damage to the peripheral nerves is called peripheral neuropathy.

Post Herpetic Neuralgia

Post Herpetic Neuralgia

Neuralgia is a sharp, stabbing, severe pain felt along the path of an irritated or damaged nerve. Pain may occur anywhere in the body but is most common in the neck and face. The pain may be triggered by nerve compression or injury, old age, or an underlying disease such as diabetes, herpes zoster infection, HIV, syphilis, and chronic renal insufficiency. It may also result due to chemical irritation, certain medications, or surgery.

Rotator Cuff Injury

Rotator Cuff Injury

A rotator cuff is a group of tendons in the shoulder joint that provides support and enables a wide range of motion. A major injury to these tendons may result in rotator cuff tears. It is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in middle-aged and older individuals.

Muscle and Joint Pain

Muscle and Joint Pain

Muscle pain or myalgia is a discomfort experienced in the muscle tissue and can be felt practically anywhere in the body.

Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic (lasting greater than six months) pain condition that most often affects one or both limbs (arm, leg, hand, or foot) usually after an injury. CRPS is characterized by prolonged or excessive pain and changes in skin color, temperature, and/or swelling in the affected area. CRPS symptoms vary in severity and duration, although some cases are mild and eventually go away.

Myofascial Pain Syndrome (Trigger Points)

Myofascial Pain Syndrome (Trigger Points)

Trigger Points/Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) refers to pain and presumed inflammation in the body's soft tissues or muscles. Myofascial pain is a chronic, painful condition that affects the fascia (connective tissue that covers the muscles). MPS might involve either a single muscle or a muscle group. In some cases, the area where a person experiences the pain might not be where the myofascial pain generator is located.

Spinal Compression Fracture

Spinal Compression Fracture

A compression fracture of the vertebra occurs when the bones of the spine (vertebrae) collapse. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the thoracic or the middle portion of the spine.

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis refers to the inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue that is present at the bottom of the foot. It runs from the heel bone to the toes and forms the arch of your foot. 

Phantom Limb Pain

Phantom Limb Pain

Phantom limb syndrome is the pain sensation felt in the area of a limb that no longer exists (post-amputation). It can occur immediately after amputation or may develop several weeks or even years later. Phantom pain can be mild or severe and long-lasting. 

practice locations
  • SCHAUMBURG, ILLINOIS

    500 W Golf Rd
    Suite 101
    Schaumburg, IL 60195
     

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  • CRYSTAL LAKE, ILLINOIS

    360 Station Drive
    Suite 200
    Crystal Lake, IL 60014

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8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Physical Therapy Hours

Monday - Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.